Courses

2019 LSRIM Course Listing and Schedule

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07/15/2019 - 09:00 to 15:00
 
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Hierarchical Linear Modelling 07/22/2019 - 09:00 to 07/23/2019 - 17:00
 
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07/24/2019 - 13:00 to 17:00
 
07/25/2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
 
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07/26/2019 - 09:00 to 16:00
 
 
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Course Descriptions

This course will provide a brief overview of working with R and R Studio before touching on some advanced topics in R. The topics will be tailored to the interests of participants, but could include the use of R Markdown, analysis of repeated-measures designs, multiple regression analysis with automatic variable selection, running simple simulations, multivariate analysis using Principle Components Analysis and Redundancy Analysis, and the creation of publication-quality figures, including those with multiple panels embedded in a single figure.

Instructor: Derek Gray
Pre-requisites: An undergraduate statistics course and basic familiarity with R is recommended.
Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P329

This 1-day workshop is geared toward those hoping to gain a basic understanding of regression analysis using SPSS. The workshop will start with simple bivariate linear regression and move onto multivariate regression with continuous, discrete and binary dependent variables. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to import data into SPSS, recode variables, run regression models and interpret results.

Instructor: Andrea Perrella
Pre-requisites: It is required that participants have a solid understanding of basic concepts in quantitative methodology, such as variable scales (nominal, ordinal, continuous), and should have a basic understanding of the meaning of inferential statistics.
Date: Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P329

This interactive 1-day session will serve as an introduction to arts-based qualitative research. Arts-based methods involve the use of artistic processes such as photography, collaging, and video-making as the mode of inquiry. Arts-based methods have been employed with many diverse communities, as these methods afford communities accessible modalities through which to engage with complicated subject matter. Students will get an overview of different arts-based methods and how they have been employed in research inquiry. Students will have opportunities to reflect on their own interest in these creative modalities. Students will then be provided an opportunity to collectively engage with one method of arts-based inquiry to explore the utility of these approaches in their work.

Instructor: Ciann Wilson
Pre-requisites: Basic understanding of qualitative methods
Date: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm P118

Ethnography is known as a qualitative research method often used by cultural anthropologists during their extensive fieldwork trips around the world. However, we'll be learning about those ethnographic techniques and approaches that have become popular in North American workplaces and are similar to the tools used by user experience designers and researchers. Participants in this 1-day workshop will learn about participant observation, ethnographic writing, ethnographic interviews, genealogical research, and auto-ethnography techniques. In addition to learning ethnographic methods, participants will learn qualitative coding techniques associated with content analysis. This session provides an overview of how to select and apply codes, the strengths and weaknesses of different analytical approaches, and best practices when interpreting ethnographic data. Throughout the workshop, participants will receive hands-on experience working through case studies and in-class projects. Participants will learn methods and techniques that can be used in their workplace or as a supplement to other research methods.

Instructor: Jennifer Long
Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of qualitative research methods
Date: Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327

You can do a lot with Microsoft Excel for everyday tasks such as data verification, sorting and filtering, generating frequencies, distributions, and measures of central tendency, and building custom pivot tables and charts – so come and learn how! This may be the most useful course you will ever take to help you at home and at work. 

Good statistical analysis starts with good data. To produce a quality dataset for analysis you need to know how to organize and work with the data you collect.  This course will provide you with the tips and practical tools for this process. You will learn how to carry out basic statistical analysis that produces valid and reliable results in a way that is feasible for those without extensive training or access to expensive statistical software. 

Instructor: Elin Moorlag Silk
Pre-requisites: Basic working knowledge of Microsoft Excel
Date: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 13:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P329

his 2-day advanced multivariate statistics course provides an introduction to applied analyses of multilevel models. Students will learn how to use multilevel models for analyzing clustered data (e.g., persons nested in groups) and longitudinal data, such as flexible strategies for modeling change and individual differences in change. Multilevel models are known by many synonyms (hierarchical linear models, general linear mixed models). The defining feature of these models is their capacity to provide quantification and prediction of random variance due to multiple sampling dimensions (across occasions, persons, or groups). Multilevel models are useful in analyzing clustered data (e.g., persons nested in groups), in which one wishes to examine predictors pertaining to individuals or to groups. Multilevel models also offer many advantages for analyzing longitudinal data, such as flexible strategies for modeling change and individual differences in change, the possibility of examining time-invariant or time-varying predictor effects, and the use of all available complete observations. This course will serve as an applied introduction to multilevel models for both longitudinal and clustered data, as well as combinations thereof. We build upon familiar regression models and expand into multilevel regression models from that starting point.

 

Instructor: Manuel Reimer, PhD
Pre-requisites: Solid knowledge of multiple regression and basic knowledge of SPSS
Date: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 09:00 to Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P329

This course will explore the nature of Indigenous thought and philosophy and its use for Indigenous research theories, methods, and methodologies.  Participants will examine Indigenous research issues within Western academic pursuits and the need and priority of implementing Indigenous research methodologies.  Participants will be exposed to aspects of Indigenous research protocols and activities that exist within Indigenous communities.

Instructor: Darren Thomas
Pre-requisites: Helpful to have knowledge of Indigenous peoples’ knowledge/history/philosophy but not necessary
Date: Monday, July 15, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327

R is a powerful and open-source software package for statistical analysis that is, by some measures, becoming the standard for data analysis in the private, public and academic sectors. It’s strengths are its open nature, flexibility, its capacity to produce compelling and informative graphics and the thousands of users that produce an astonishing array of packages that enable the software to perform statistical packages. This day-long session will introduce participants to R tailored to their topics of interest and level of familiarity with statistics and data analysis. Topics will include basic data management strategies, producing descriptive and bivariate statistics, the linear and generalized linear model and data visualization.

Instructor: Derek Gray
Pre-requisites: An undergraduate course in statistical analysis
Date: Monday, July 15, 2019 - 09:00 to 15:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P329

This 1-day workshop is suitable for people working with qualitative data. The first half of the course will cover basic usage of NVIVO software, organizing data and/or literature, basic coding, and methodological considerations. The afternoon portion of the course will cover intermediate-advanced usage of NVIVO such as, creating a codebook, querying/quantifying data, coding audio/video, organizing classifications, and data visualization. This course is taught using an interactive approach and attendees will be able to practice their skills using NVIVO. Individuals are encouraged to bring a working dataset or a selection of literature. If you do not have current data or relevant literature to review, a sample dataset and literature will also be provided.

Instructor: Charlie Davis
Pre-requisites: None
Date: Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P329

Qualitative data analysis (QDA) turns qualitative information into findings. It is the process through which we identify, explain, interpret and make sense of qualitative data. This course offers an overview of concepts, approaches, and strategies in QDA, with a focus on analysing data from interviews. It provides a comprehensive introduction to thematic analysis, a method that is broadly applicable. By the end of this course, you have a better understanding of how to plan for QDA, be familiar with basic coding techniques, know how to ensure your findings are trustworthy, and be ready to start analysing qualitative data. This is a hands-on course; you will have opportunity to practice your new knowledge and skill by working with tutorial data. This workshop is appropriate for academics and professionals alike.

Instructor: Katie Cook
Pre-requisites: None
Date: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327

This half-day beginner level workshop is ideal for anyone interested in learning how to navigate Qualtrics. This workshop introduces the basic features of Qualtrics, a powerful survey tool that allows users to create surveys, collect data and generate reports. Participants will receive hands-on experience working through example surveys and in-class exercises. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to navigate Qualtrics, create a new survey, add a variety of different question types, learn how to collaborate with other users, become familiar with the various distribution methods and learn how to generate reports. 

Instructor: Allison McManus
Pre-requisites: None
Date: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 09:00 to 12:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P329

This 1-day workshop is ideal for anyone working, or planning to work, with survey data. No background in research methods or statistical analysis is required. This workshop introduces basic skills in data analysis using SPSS. The day will mix discussion of statistical analysis principles (e.g. variables, formulating hypotheses, levels of measurement, univariate statistics, bivariate statistics, etc.) with hands-on training. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to import data into SPSS, recode variables, generate tables, and execute some basic descriptive analysis.

Instructor: Anthony Piscitelli
Pre-requisites: None
Date: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P329

In this short course, participants will work through activities to develop their academic professionalization skills by having a P.L.A.N. – tips on Professional development, Life skills, Academic development, and Networking. Originally developed by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Louisville, PLAN is a framework for understanding and addressing the needs of students in the midst of graduate school or transitioning into junior faculty members. Using the PLAN framework as a springboard, this session will provide one mini-workshop in each of the following areas: (1) Professional development - The tried, tested and true grant application; (2) Life Skills - Snakes and ladders: Research, teaching, and service as a graduate student in Canadian post-secondary institutions; (3) Academic development (ideation) – Visual mind mapping tools for project success; and, (4) Networking - Lessons learned on how to avoid a conference flop. 

Participants should come equipped with an understanding of their (proposed) research project or grant in mind. Participants should also take part in the google forms survey to help the instructor prepare the material (7 days in advance)

Instructor: Jennifer Long
Pre-requisites: This workshop is intended for undergraduates entering graduate school, or a current Masters or PhD student enrolled in graduate school.
Date: Friday, July 26, 2019 - 09:00 to 16:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327

Research is a collaborative effort which depends on the successful coordination of multiple individuals, components and goals. This one-day workshop will teach you how to oversee effective research teams by introducing you to the fundamental concepts, tools and techniques of project management. It is intended for those who want to expand their interpersonal, organizational and leadership skills. Topics covered include basic communication for projects, group processes and dynamics, conflict resolution, managing roles and workloads, and effective decision- making. Attention will also be given to community-based work, and how to use these skills for projects involving community members and organizations as active contributors. This will be an interactive course and you are encouraged to contribute to an environment of co-learning by bringing your personal experiences, knowledge and questions. This workshop is appropriate for academics and professionals alike.

Instructor: Sarah Ranco
Date: Friday, July 19, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327

Have you ever wondered about qualitative research and how you can use it for your own work? Together, in this full-day course, we will explore the following five approaches to qualitative research: case study, ethnography, grounded theory, narrative research, and phenomenology. For each approach we will discuss:

  • Origins and defining features
  • Associated methods
  • Common data analysis and presentation techniques
  • Challenges and/or ethical considerations

No prerequisites but some understanding of the fundamentals of qualitative research is assumed. Please be prepared for group discussions to help clarify and reinforce course concepts. Participants who wish to do some reading in advance (not mandatory) may wish to explore the following reference as background reading for the session: Creswell, J., & Poth, C. (2017). Qualitative inquiry & research design: Choosing among five approaches (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. A more comprehensive list of resources will be provided at the end of the
course.

Instructor: Margaret Douglin
Pre-requisites: No prerequisites but some understanding of the fundamentals of qualitative research is assumed.
Date: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327

Have you ever wondered about qualitative research and how you can use it for your own work? Together, in this full-day course, we will explore the following five approaches to qualitative research: case study, ethnography, grounded theory, narrative research, and phenomenology. For each approach we will discuss:

  • Origins and defining features
  • Associated methods
  • Common data analysis and presentation techniques
  • Challenges and/or ethical considerations

No prerequisites but some understanding of the fundamentals of qualitative research is assumed. Please be prepared for group discussions to help clarify and reinforce course concepts. Participants who wish to do some reading in advance (not mandatory) may wish to explore the following reference as background reading for the session: Creswell, J., & Poth, C. (2017). Qualitative inquiry & research design: Choosing among five approaches (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. A more comprehensive list of resources will be provided at the end of the
course.

Instructor: Jennifer Marshman
Pre-requisites: No prerequisites but some understanding of the fundamentals of qualitative research is assumed.
Date: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327

Many people underestimate the art and science that goes into developing and designing a good survey. This 1-day course will help you develop surveys that will help your respondents to understand and answer the questions the way you intended it. The instructor will draw on several decades of psychological research on the survey response process as well as his own experience as a researcher, teacher and consultant in survey design. The course is structured along 10 core principles of good survey design and is easy to follow with no prior knowledge needed. Among others, topics include the cognitive-affective survey response process, the survey development process, survey structure and format, question wording, and online surveys. The course is conducted in an interactive way and participants will be able to apply their knowledge through practice exercises.

Instructor: Sean Simpson, MA
Pre-requisites: None
Date: Monday, July 22, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327

Interviewing is the most common method of data collection used in qualitative research. This 1-day course provides a detailed overview of individual and group interviews, which are the most common methods of data collection used in qualitative research. By the end of this session, you will be familiar with benefits and challenges of interviewing, how to create an interview protocol, how to craft effective questions, key skills in conducting the interview, and how to assess the quality of an interview. This is a hands-on course; you will have opportunity to practice your new knowledge and skill through role-playing in small groups. This workshop is appropriate for academics and professionals alike.

Instructor: Nicole Burns
Pre-requisites: None
Date: Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 09:45 to 17:00
Location: Frank C. Peters, Rm. P327